All Clear Septic

Buying or Selling a Home in Massachusetts

All Clear Septic

If you are buying or selling a home that has a septic system in the State of Massachusetts, there are a few things you need to know. A brand new septic system can cost you as much as $30,000 or more to replace, however with proper septic system maintenance, it can continue to work effectively and efficiently for approximately 25 years.

The standard home inspection that is required when you buy or sell your home in Massachusetts does not include an inspection of the septic system. There is a separate inspection required in the State of Massachusetts that homeowners need to be aware of, which is called the Title 5 Inspection.

What is a Title 5 Inspection?

A Title 5 Inspection is a complete and thorough inspection of your septic system. This inspection must be performed by a person who has been certified by the State of Massachusetts through the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection.

A Title 5 Inspection is a part of the Environmental Code for the State of Massachusetts, which regulates all septic systems and works to provide these inspections for the health and safety of the public, as well as the protection of the environment.

The inspection checks to ensure that the septic system has been properly constructed and checks to ensure that any upgrades were done according to code and state regulations. The inspector also checks to ensure that proper septic maintenance has been performed throughout the lifetime of the system.

For the Buyer

In the State of Massachusetts, it is the responsibility of the buyer to ask the seller about the septic systems. You should ask when the system was last pumped and how many people are currently living in the home. A typical system should be pumped about every 2-3 years, more often if there are more than 5 residents in the home. Increased demand, particularly in a situation where more people are living in the home than it was designed to hold, can lead to many damaging problems.

The number of bedrooms in a home dictates the design and capacity of the septic system that gets installed. However, in some cases, a home may have more bedrooms than the original design due to remodeling or by poor quality design by the installer. A home that has more bedrooms than the system was designed for will very likely experience system failure much earlier than the typical longevity for a residential system.

Once you get the information from the seller, make sure to consult with a septic system inspection and maintenance service that is certified in the State of Massachusetts, such as Septic Preservation Services. SPS  is certified to inspect septic systems all over Southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island as well as New Hampshire and Maine and can give you the information you need about the health and condition of the septic system in a home you are thinking about buying.

For the Seller

If you are thinking about selling your home you should make sure that you get proper septic system maintenance and consider calling out a local service to do a review of your system. SPS offers a service known as a Confidential Voluntary Assessment, which will go through your entire system, just like a Title 5 Inspection. This assessment is completely confidential, giving you the opportunity to repair or maintain your system without having to go through the state like you would with an official Title 5.

Proper septic system maintenance should be taken care of year round from the day you purchase your home, and should not be thought of as a last minute fix before selling your home. The tank should be pumped on a regular schedule, the drain field should be kept free of vegetation that could clog the drain lines and your entire family needs to be aware of excessive water use hazards. An annual inspection of your system will help monitor it for any minor problems that can be fixed before they result in major, costly repairs.

Once you are sure that your system is working effectively and efficiently, you can get a Title 5 Inspection. This is an excellent selling point because once your system is certified in the State of Massachusetts, you can list it as “Title 5 Certified” with your real estate agent. If your system fails the inspection and you are unable to get it fixed, you would need to list it as “Failed Title 5” with the agency. While this can be a problem for some buyers, it is better to let them know up front what to expect when they purchase your home.

The More You Know…

Before you buy or sell your home in Massachusetts, it is important to know everything you can about proper septic system maintenance and care, as well as requirements of Title 5 Inspection by the State of Massachusetts. Call Septic  Preservation Services for a consultation if you unsure of how to proceed. We service residential and commercial customers all over Southeastern Massachusetts, including New Bedford, Fall River, Middleboro, Dartmouth and out on the Cape, as well as all throughout Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Maine.   Give us a call at 877—378-4279 for more information about our septic and wastewater services or visit www.septicpreservation.com

you are buying or selling a home that has a septic system in the State of Massachusetts, there are a few things you need to know. A brand new septic system can cost you as much as $30,000 or more to replace, however with proper septic system maintenance, it can continue to work effectively and efficiently for approximately 25 years.

The standard home inspection that is required when you buy or sell your home in Massachusetts does not include an inspection of the septic system. There is a separate inspection required in the State of Massachusetts that homeowners need to be aware of, which is called the Title 5 Inspection.

What is a Title 5 Inspection?

A Title 5 Inspection is a complete and thorough inspection of your septic system. This inspection must be performed by a person who has been certified by the State of Massachusetts through the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection.

A Title 5 Inspection is a part of the Environmental Code for the State of Massachusetts, which regulates all septic systems and works to provide these inspections for the health and safety of the public, as well as the protection of the environment.

The inspection checks to ensure that the septic system has been properly constructed and checks to ensure that any upgrades were done according to code and state regulations. The inspector also checks to ensure that proper septic maintenance has been performed throughout the lifetime of the system.

For the Buyer

In the State of Massachusetts, it is the responsibility of the buyer to ask the seller about the septic systems. You should ask when the system was last pumped and how many people are currently living in the home. A typical system should be pumped about every 2-3 years, more often if there are more than 5 residents in the home. Increased demand, particularly in a situation where more people are living in the home than it was designed to hold, can lead to many damaging problems.

The number of bedrooms in a home dictates the design and capacity of the septic system that gets installed. However, in some cases, a home may have more bedrooms than the original design due to remodeling or by poor quality design by the installer. A home that has more bedrooms than the system was designed for will very likely experience system failure much earlier than the typical longevity for a residential system.

Once you get the information from the seller, make sure to consult with a septic system inspection and maintenance service that is certified in the State of Massachusetts, such as All-Clear Septic out of Acushnet, Massachusetts. All-Clear is certified to inspect septic systems all over Southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island, and can give you the information you need about the health and condition of the septic system in a home you are thinking about buying.

For the Seller

If you are thinking about selling your home you should make sure that you get proper septic system maintenance and consider calling out a local service to do a review of your system. All-Clear Septic offers a service known as a Confidential Voluntary Assessment, which will go through your entire system, just like a Title 5 Inspection. This assessment is completely confidential, giving you the opportunity to repair or maintain your system without having to go through the state like you would with an official Title 5.

Proper septic system maintenance should be taken care of year round from the day you purchase your home, and should not be thought of as a last minute fix before selling your home. The tank should be pumped on a regular schedule, the drain field should be kept free of vegetation that could clog the drain lines and your entire family needs to be aware of excessive water use hazards. An annual inspection of your system will help monitor it for any minor problems that can be fixed before they result in major, costly repairs.

Once you are sure that your system is working effectively and efficiently, you can get a Title 5 Inspection. This is an excellent selling point because once your system is certified in the State of Massachusetts, you can list it as “Title 5 Certified” with your real estate agent. If your system fails the inspection and you are unable to get it fixed, you would need to list it as “Failed Title 5” with the agency. While this can be a problem for some buyers, it is better to let them know up front what to expect when they purchase your home.

The More You Know…

Before you buy or sell your home in Massachusetts, it is important to know everything you can about proper septic system maintenance and care, as well as requirements of Title 5 Inspection by the State of Massachusetts. Call All-Clear Septic for a consultation if you unsure of how to proceed. We service residential and commercial customers all over Southeastern Massachusetts, including New Bedford, Fall River, Middleboro, Dartmouth and out on the Cape, as well as all throughout Rhode Island. Give us a call at 508-763-4431 for more information about our septic and wastewater services or visit www.allclearseptic.com

pipes

Gurgling Pipes? What Can It Mean?

pipesIf you are a homeowner with a septic system, you know how to use your senses to stay alert about potential issues that might occur. While preventative maintenance is the best way to stop a backed up septic system before it even starts, it is also important to know how to use your ears, eyes and nose to spot a problem before it gets out of hand.

Some of the most common signs of problems with a septic system include sounds, sights and smells. If you have gurgling septic pipes, it could be indicative of a much bigger problem. Your best bet is to contact a professional service provider who can conduct some septic system troubleshooting tests and help it to work properly.

How to Use Your Senses
We all know the normal sounds of water and waste moving through the drains of our home. That being said, any unusual sounds will generally alert us to the idea that something isn’t right. Gurgling septic pipes are usually a sign of a backed up septic system that is clogged. The pipes that are connected to the system will make a very distinct gurgling sound. If you have ever heard this before, you know exactly what this sounds like.

Once you use your ears to hear that you have gurgling septic pipes, it is important to confirm the extent of the problem. The next thing to check is your drain or leach field. If there is flooding or puddles of water above your septic system, chances are good that you have a backed up septic system. This flooding is also sometimes accompanied by a distinct “sewage” odor in the area surrounding your drain or leach field.

Another thing to check for is the operation of other plumbing within the home. For example, part of septic system troubleshooting is to identify whether or not drains and toilets are operating more slowly than usual. In the case of a severely backed up septic system, some drains will back up completely, causing standing water and possible sewage to come up in shower drains or sinks. If you see, hear or smell any of the symptoms of a backed up septic system above, contact your septic system repair or maintenance service right away.

What Causes Gurgling Pipes?
While gurgling pipes are usually a sign of a backed up septic system, there are different situations that can cause your pipes to gurgle. This is why it is important to contact a professional septic system troubleshooting company right away. While some problems can be small and easy to fix, others could be more complex and might cause more damage if left unchecked for too long.

The gurgling sound in the pipes can be caused by a blockage between the pipes that connect the plumbing in your house to your septic system. Gurgling septic pipes can also be caused by a plugged house sewer vent or blockage within the pipes between the drain or leach field and the septic tank itself. Other more serious issues, such as septic drain field failure, can also cause your plumbing to make those distinctive gurgling noises.

Other Types of Gurgling
Another area of the home to keep any eye on is the toilet, as this is where the most waste will be flushed out of your home. A toilet can make gurgling noises if the water and air inside the pipes isn’t flowing normally. Septic system owners need to be aware that a gurgling toilet, much like gurgling pipes, can be indicative of a potentially backed up septic system. This early warning can give you enough time to contact a professional service to conduct septic system troubleshooting and repair issues before they get out of hand.

A gurgling toilet can also be a sign of a partial clog. In some cases, you can simply use a plunger to apply pressure to the drain line to dislodge the clog. This will allow it to go down into the pipe and will eliminate the gurgling noises. Larger clogs may require the use of a toilet snake tool to dislodge the clog. If the gurgling noises continue in your toilet after using a plunger or toilet snake tool, chances are you have a bigger problem with a backed up septic system.

Prevention is Key
When it comes to problems associated with owning a home that has a septic system, it is important to remember that good septic maintenance and prevention is very important. Signing up for a preventative maintenance program, such as the one offered by All-Clear Septic & Wastewater, is a great way to stay on top of your system with regular check-ups. Never add chemical additives or “septic clean up” products to your system, as many of these can actually hurt your septic system.

Reading all of the tips about septic system ownership can help you to keep your system running clean and healthy.   Contact Septic Preservation Services with any questions at 877-378-4279  or visit www.septic preservation.com

drain cleaners

Drain Cleaners Can Hurt Your Septic System

drain cleanersDrain cleaners can be an easy choice when your kitchen or bathroom drain becomes clogged, but they are not a great choice for the health of your septic system.  Septic systems rely on natural bacteria  to treat wastewater.   The harsh chemicals found in drain cleaners can kill the beneficial bacteria needed by your septic system to process wastewater.

Chemical drain cleaners are one of the most dangerous of all the cleaning products on the market to human health.  Most contain very corrosive ingredients such as sulfuric acid, lye, and bleach that can burn your eyes and skin.  They can be fatal if ingested and these cleaning products are required by law to carry a warning label listing their harsh ingredients.   Care must be taken to keep these out of the reach of children.

Even very low amounts of a drain cleaner used in a septic system results in significant decreases in concentrations of Coliform bacteria and a decrease in PH when higher concentrations are used.  It could take up to 48 hours for bacteria population to recover to original levels.

What is a solution to your clogged drains?  The best remedy is to prevent drains from being clogged by having good catch basins in all the drains of the home.  Purchasing inexpensive plastic or metal screens for the drains can keep many wastes from going down the drain including hair and food products.   Food scraps as well as oils  and grease should never be allowed down the drain.

Most clogs occur about 6 inches below the drain opening in the trap.   Taking apart and cleaning this area can remove the clog.  Plungers can also be helpful in removing a clogged drain.   If that doesn’t work, a snake or auger can be put down the drain to remove the blockage.   Clean-out ports can be removes to help access the clog.  If no luck, it’s always best to call a professional who has the equipment and expertise to get the job done.

If you feel you must use a chemical drain cleaner, look for an enzyme-based cleaner.  They are less harsh on your system.  You can also try a homemade recipe:  Pour 1/2 cup salt and 1/2 cup baking soda down the clogged drain.  Then pour 6 cups of boiling water after it.   Let it sit overnight and then flush with hot water.

Septic Preservation Services can help you with any of your septic system questions.  Call 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com

Septic Preservation Services

Camouflage Your Septic Tank Risers

How do you keep your septic tank risers out of sight?

Septic Preservation Services Van on a Service Call
If you have had your septic system outfitted with the proper septic tank risers, you most likely have a cover sitting in the middle of your garden, lawn or somewhere unsightly. Keeping these covers easily accessible is important, but that doesn’t mean you have to put a sign on them! Hiding these risers is very simple and easy, and can be done without getting in the way of someone servicing your system.

The simplest way is to just put a light fake stone or decorative item on the cover. The key here is to keep it light, you don’t want to damage your system and the service company can pump the system as needed. A lighthouse, light birdbath or other decorative lawn ornament is an easy way to keep that riser out of sight!

Another way is to plant small plants around it. This will effectively camouflage the cover from most people. Keep in mind that should anyone need to access the tank, the plants may get in the way so be sure to leave space somewhere so the septic crew can get to the tank unhindered.

Rock features or stepping stones are another great way to keep the cover out of sight. Placing these around the cover with some light decorative item over the cover itself is a great way to hide the riser. It also may be a way to ad a nice decorative piece to your lawn!

If you need an inspection, have questions or need septic services, please call Septic Preservation Services at 877-378-4279!  Visit www.septicpreservation.com
Septic Preservation Services

Septic Preservation Services

Septic Preservation Conducting Septic Inspections

    Septic Preservation Services  Septic Preservation Services will be conducting septic inspections and routine septic maintenance in the following towns this week; Acton, Alna, Arundel, Bath, Belmont, Cape Elizabeth, Freeport, Hebron, Lebanon, Turner, and Wells. If you would like a septic inspection please call our office.  Call us at 877-378-4279  or visit us at www.septicpreservation.com

septic emergencies

Preventing Septic Emergencies

summer-still-life-783347_640Summertime is here and many times means summer guests, especially if you live along the shores of Southcoast Massachusetts and Rhode Island.  Whether you a planning on hosting a party, having guests stay over or if you are just having a quiet evening at home, a septic system emergency can ruin your summer plans. The best thing you can do is prepare now and work to prevent septic emergencies before they even happen. If you have a septic system you are already aware of the do’s and don’ts of on-site wastewater responsibilities. This list of eight preventative measures will help you to take your maintenance and care knowledge to the next level, ensuring that you won’t have to pay for expensive septic emergencies in the coming winter months.

#1 – Get an Inspection Before It Gets Cold
One of the most important things you can do is to contact your septic system service and request an annual inspection before the ground freezes and cold weather sets in for the season. Septic repairs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island will be much more expensive if your technician has to dig down under the snow and into solid ground. However, if you do have a septic emergency, Septic Preservation Services works all year-round in any type of weather – rain, snow or freezing cold. You can count on All-Clear to keep your septic system working effectively and efficiently all year long.

#2 – Sign Up for Routine Pumping
As part of a good preventative maintenance program, routine pumping should also be scheduled to ensure that your septic system is properly maintained throughout the year. By scheduling your routine pumping just prior to the late fall and winter season, before it gets so cold that the ground freezes, you can ensure that your septic system will be running at its best throughout the holiday and winter seasons. Ask your All-Clear Septic & Wastewater representative about signing up for a preventative maintenance program that includes regular inspections, check-ups and routine pumping.

#3 – Reduce Your Water Usage
When you know you are expecting a lot of guests, make sure to reduce your water usage in advance of their arrival. Take showers the day before and bathe your children before they arrive. Taking shorter showers helps, but make sure to talk with your guests about limiting water use. Do laundry and dishes a few days ahead of time to reduce the amount of water usage that will occur when the guests are at your home. Better planning will reduce the amount of problems you will have with your septic system during the summer months.

#4 – Talk About Flushing
It may be difficult, but it is important to speak with your guests about the things that they flush down your toilets and drains. Routine pumping can make sure that your system is ready to handle accidents or a single-instance flushing, but the more you can educate your guests about the importance of using the trash can instead of the toilet for diapers, feminine hygiene products, cigarette butts and other potentially hazardous items. This will help prevent those items from getting into your tank and it will also prevent a blockage and potential backup from occurring.

#5 – Prepare Your Food Ahead of Time
If there is any prep work that you need to do for a big summertime meal or party, try to do it ahead of time as well. Cut veggies up that need to be washed ahead of time and store them in your refrigerator drawers in plastic zip bags. Wash and marinate the chicken and get it ready to go on the grill.   Not only will this space out your water usage before your guests get there, but it will also give you more time to spend with them when they arrive. Believe it or not, it’s the little things you do that add up to making a big difference in preventing costly  septic repairs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

#6 – Don’t Use the Garbage Disposal
Even if your house came with a garbage disposal already installed, you should avoid using it at all costs. All that extra waste into your septic system can wreck havoc, especially during the busy days with your summer guests.  Consider blocking the switch for the garbage disposal so you – and especially your guests – won’t be tempted to use it. Keep a small composting can on your counter – they have some very nice-looking decorative options at home improvement stores. You can put all of your vegetable peelings, coffee grounds and other items that should not go down your drain into the bin. Your guests will see you doing this and will follow suit.

#7 – Consider Using Disposable Dishes and Silverware
If you are having a lot of guests over for a dinner party or even just for cocktails and appetizers, consider using disposable dishes and silverware to reduce the amount of rinsing and washing you’ll have to do later. It’s better to have an over-loaded trash can for one week of garbage collection than to pay a lot of money for septic repairs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

#8 – Sign Up for a Preventative Maintenance Program
The best way to avoid costly septic repairs as a result of failure due to neglect or misuse is to sign up for a preventative maintenance program. Working with a licensed, certified professional septic system repair and inspection company can help you with routine pumping and help you to be prepared for an onslaught of guests during the hot summer months. Aside from being much more cost-effective, a preventative maintenance program gives you the peace of mind that your septic system is being properly taken care of and that a professional is on top of the situation.

Summer is already here.   Contact Septic Preservation Services to sign up for a routine pumping and ask about their preventative maintenance program. The better prepared you are during the summer, the less money you’ll have to pay for septic repairs in Massachusetts during the winter months when the ground is frozen and your yard is piled high with snow. All-Clear is available for septic inspection, maintenance and repair during every season and can help you keep your septic system running effectively and efficiently all year long.

You can reach us at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com for more information.

Septic Preservation Services

Septic Preservation Services in Portsmouth, RI

Septic Preservation Services Septic Preservation Services works with Portsmouth residents to provide mandatory inspections of the septic systems. The Portsmouth Wastewater Management Board is empowered by the town of Portsmouth to improve the essential systems required to properly protect public health as well as our natural recourses. Routine septic inspections are required to comply with the regulations. Septic Preservation Services can perform either First Maintenance Inspections and Routine Periodic Inspections. If you own a property served by a septic system in Portsmouth, RI please call our office for questions about our septic inspection services.  Call us at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com

Septic Preservation Services

Septic Preservation Services Adds Calendar to Website

Septic Preservation Services Septic Preservation Services is launching a new tool for our customers. We have added a calendar of events to our website. This calendar will be available to all customers and show what services will be provided on any given day. For example it may state title 5 septic inspections in Rochester, Lakeville, Norton and Mansfield or it may show Septic system repair in Swansea. This tool is intended to help our customers know when their system will be serviced.

cleaning products

Cleaning Products Safe for Septic Systems

cleaning productsOne of the most important ingredients in your septic tank system is the microorganisms that live in the tank. These naturally-occurring microorganisms work to break down waste solids and process the sludge and wastewater in your system. Unfortunately, many of the chemicals and cleaning agents used in our everyday lives are harmful to the microorganisms. Homeowners that have a septic system, should refrain from using dangerous products that could potentially make their way into the septic tank and kill off these helpful microorganisms. Here are some tips that will help you to choose the best possible products for your home that are also safe for septic systems.

Chemical Cleaners 101
Part of septic tank care is knowing what you can put down the drain, and what you can’t. Septic systems in New Hampshire and Maine are vulnerable to failure caused by user error. The best way to stay on top of your septic system and ensure that it is working effectively and efficiently to process and remove waste is to get a preventative maintenance program from your local septic system service provider. A professional, experience technician can help to keep your system running in tip top shape and give you advice on proper septic tank care.

To determine whether or not a cleaning product is dangerous to your septic system, read the label. Many cleaning products are required to use the words “dangerous” or “poisonous” on their labeling to advise consumers of the danger associated with using or misusing the product. The word “warning” on a label indicates a moderate level of hazard associated with the product and the word “caution” is dangerous to an even lesser degree.

Your best bet is to choose cleaning products that say “septic friendly,” but they can be hard to find. Choose products that contain active ingredients that are bio-based or natural, as opposed to chemical-based cleaners. For example, citrus, vegetable, pine oils and seed-based cleaners are a better choice than chemical options. Don’t trust advertising claims that call products “green” or even “environmentally certified,” as many of those claims are exaggerated and have nothing to do with being safe for septic use.

Disinfectants 101
Another product that people who have septic systems in New Hampshire and Maine need to be aware of is disinfectant. While these products are extremely helpful in reducing exposure to germs, bacteria, viruses and other potentially hazardous and infectious microorganisms, they will also kill the helpful microorganisms inside your septic tank.

Limit the use of disinfectants to surfaces, such as counter tops, trash cans and tables, rather than in sinks or toilets, areas that could cause these products to make their way into your septic system. Natural fruit or vegetable based all-purpose cleaners should be used in these vulnerable areas.

Homemade Solutions
There are a lot of homemade solutions that can be used to clean your home instead of chemical-based products. In addition to being beneficial to septic tank care and being safe for septic systems, these homemade solutions go a long way toward reducing the amount of chemical exposure to your family. Even families without septic systems are turning to these tried and true homemade solutions and are moving away from chemical-based cleaners.

  • Vinegar is a very effective cleaner for most household surfaces. It can be used to remove stains from tile or porcelain, eliminate hard water stains from shower doors and is an excellent choice for cleaning a smelly dishwasher or washing machine. It is the best choice for cleaning a toilet bowl. Just pour two cups of vinegar into the bowl and allow it to sit overnight. Scrub with a brush and flush.
  • Lemon juice is a natural wonder, due to its acidic qualities. It is also a natural disinfectant and will leave your home smelling fresh and clean. It can be used to clean counter tops, toilet bowls, sinks and kitchen appliances. Add two cups of lemon juice to a bucket of hot water and scrub. It can also be used in the toilet similar to the vinegar solution for an alternative cleaning option.
  • Baking soda works to both clean and deodorize your home naturally. It is safe for septic systems and is one of the best cleaners to use for those who are concerned about septic tank care. Just sprinkle baking soda onto counter tops, in sinks, onto the toilet bowl or anywhere else that needs cleaning. Scrub with a sponge or brush and wipe or rinse away with water.

Preventative Maintenance Program
Once you learn how to read the labels and how to avoid using potentially damaging chemicals in your home, the best thing to do for septic systems in New Hampshire and Maine is to join a preventative maintenance program with a trusted, professional septic system service company. Septic Preservation Services has been serving customers throughout the  region since 1995 and is licensed and insured to provide residential and commercial services in both New Hampshire and Maine.

In addition to a comprehensive preventative maintenance program, Septic Preservation Services also offers New Hampshire and Maine inspections, confidential septic evaluations, trouble shooting services, remedial repairs and septic rejuvenation. Homeowners with septic systems in New Hampshire and Maine can trust the knowledge and experience of the technicians at Septic Preservation Services. Call SPS at 877-378-4279 for pricing, information or to set up an appointment for an inspection of your residential or commercial property.  Visit www.septicpreservation.com for more information.

Septic Preservation Services

Septic Preservation Services Provides High Quality Service

Septic Preservation Services6/29/16 Septic Preservation Services and our sister companies All Clear Wastewater Services and Down to Earth Construction are working throughout southeastern Massachusetts to provide complete high quality service to our customers. As a group we can provide full services including septic inspections, septic pumping, drain cleaning, operation and maintenance of aerobic treatment units, septic system designs, and complete septic system installations. Call us at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com